Contents

We have all had to learn how to shoot a pistol at one time or another whether it was through a civilian shooting class, the military, or some other setting. The one thing I am sure that we all learned about was the basic “pistol fundamentals” of marksmanship. The fundamentals are supposed to be a list of key factors that you must pay special attention to if you wish to make an accurate shot.

Pistol Fundamentals Simplified: How much accuracy do you really need?

Pistol Fundamentals Simplified: How much accuracy do you really need?We have all had to learn how to shoot a pistol at one time or another whether it was through a civilian shooting class, the military, or some other setting. The one thing I am sure that we all learned about was the basic “pistol fundamentals” of marksmanship. The fundamentals are supposed to be a list of key factors that you must pay special attention to if you wish to make an accurate shot. Just to name the fundamentals you may have been taught, with a brief definition of their general meanings: Stance- Positioning your body in such a way that allows you to stabilize yourself during the firing process. Grip- Holding the pistol in such a way that allows you full control of the pistol. Sight alignment Lining up the front sight so that it is flush and centered in the rear sight notch. Sight picture- Placing the properly aligned sights at the point at which you wish the shot to impact. Trigger control- Manipulating the trigger to the rear with a gradual pressure so that it surprises you once the shot breaks Breathing control- Controlling your breathing so that the shot breaks at the end of the exhale Now if we look at this list, we may imagine ourselves following each of these perfectly. It seems so simple when we realize what each one of these fundamentals are. But those of us that have been shooting for a long time have found two things to be true. You are not always ABLE to follow every one of the fundamentals. You do not always NEED to follow every one of the fundamentals. Too often I hear people talking about how you need to always hit exactly where you intend to hit. This is important and is the hope, but the reality of the situation is you may have to accept near hits. Some people go as far as to trash the gun they are shooting if they fail to group well with it. I am sure we have all heard the term “combat accuracy” at some time or another. Basically, I define it as meaning that the shot was not really placed exactly where I wanted it to go, but it still impacted in an acceptable area. Is there anything wrong with these types of hits? Yes and no, depending on how you’re shooting and the situation. If you are on a static range and you have all the time in the world, you might as well use as many of the little fundamentals and slow fire methods at your disposal to make a hit. In the static position, you don’t need to accept a big miss. But if you are trying to shoot fast and still make a hit under stress, you are just gonna have to take what you can get. Most of the time if shooting fast or at a distance, you are not going to have the luxury of reconfirming that your sights are on and that you have the best grip before you jack the trigger to the rear. This is just the way it is. Let us look at the two fundamentals that will make or break a shot, no matter who is shooting. Of course sight picture and having your sights are important, but we are specifically discussing what you need to hit what your sights are on and therefore sight picture is not of concern. First thing to keep in mind is trigger control in the sense that you should be able to pull/squeeze/press the trigger as fast as you can without using other fingers in order to get leverage. Failure to do this is the actual culprit in missing from what I have seen. Concentrate on independently using your trigger finger in order to negate this issue. Once you are capable of doing this, you should be golden and your rate and method of trigger pull will not be an issue. Either way, manipulating the trigger in a way that does not disturb the sights is the ultimate goal. Second thing that is going to be important, even if only a little, is the grip. If you do not hold onto the pistol under the firing sequence, your anxiety may take over and send the shot off course from trying to get a last-minute hold of the weapon. Even if all you use is the thumb and middle finger to hold the pistol, it will easy your anxiety to keep it secure in those two fingers. All in all, we as human beings desire complete control of the situations that we are in. Though trigger control is the leading fundamental that dictates the success of our shots, it has a pattern of causing us to default to using our grip in order to establish better control of the pistol. So in this case, why not admit that the grip is also an important fundamental that can make or break the success of your trigger control? Other than those two fundamentals, we may find ourselves adding other fundamentals under stress in order to establish better control of the pistol. I will not tell you that it is unnecessary to learn all of the fundamentals because it absolutely is important. But I will say that we will rarely find ourselves adhering or even coming close to using every fundamental. It is on us to recognize this and accept this. Once you do that, you may find yourself being capable of shooting better and better with less practice. Spotter Up team member Dave Donchess on video. Follow Dave on his Youtube page Subscribe to Blog via Email About The Author David Donchess David Donchess served in the Marine Corp as an infantry assaultman for two deployments before being medically retired. He moved with his wife to Alaska and now runs a YouTube channel while fostering, training, and rehabilitating rescue dogs. This post first appeared on Spotterup,com

Our Review of the Top 8: Best Hearing & Ear Protection

Our Review of the Top 8: Best Hearing & Ear Protection

Advertisment There’s a lot of gear in the world of shooting sports. Most of us have a long (and expensive) list of want-to-buy firearms , ammo , and magazines. Then there’s the tactical clothes , the gloves , the classes, and a ton of other stuff to help us shoot better. What we sometimes forget is the less fun gear, but it’s nonetheless important. Unless you’re shooting a pellet gun or an MP5SD with a suppressor attached, you’re going to need to protect your ears. Anyone who has been at a range with folks who don’t wear ear protection knows that “ What!? ” is the call of an unprepared shooter. Keeping your hearing and avoiding tinnitus is vital to your quality of life, so we’ve put together a list of ear protection devices that will make sure you enjoy your hearing for years to come. There are two types of hearing protection. The first fit over the ear, such as muffs or headphones. These offer the most protection but are often heavy and sometimes bulky. The other kind, earbuds, go in the ear and offer a little less protection, but are small and more compatible with hats and helmets. Either way, you can easily find something on our list to keep your hearing intact. Top Picks Contents 1. Peltor Sport Tactical 100 Electronic Hearing Protector 2. Howard Leight by Honeywell Impact Pro High Noise Reduction Rating Sound Amplification Electronic Shooting Earmuffs 3. SureFire EP4 Sonic Defenders Plus Filtered Earplugs 4. Walker’s Silencer Digital Earbuds 5. 3M Peltor Soundtrap/Tactical 6-S Electronic Headset 6. Smith & Wesson Passive 33 NRR Hearing Protection Muffs 7. G & F 12010 34dB Highest NRR Safety Ear Muffs 8. Boomstick Low Profile Noise Cancelling Hearing Protection Parting Shots 1. "Peltor Sport Tactical" 100 "Electronic Hearing Protector" Product Peltor Sport Tactical 100 Electronic Hearing Protector, Ear... Top Overall Pick NRR: 22 dB noise reduction rating IDEAL FOR both indoor and outdoor shooters and hunters VARIABLE SUPPRESSION TIME reduces echoes indoors ADAPTIVE FREQUENCY RESPONSE reduces background noise for clearer... DURABLE RECESSED MICROPHONES prevent damage and reduce wind noise ADJUSTABLE HEADBAND added padding for a comfortable fit Our rating Details NRR: 22 dB noise reduction rating IDEAL FOR both indoor and outdoor shooters and hunters VARIABLE SUPPRESSION TIME reduces echoes indoors ADAPTIVE FREQUENCY RESPONSE reduces background noise for clearer... DURABLE RECESSED MICROPHONES prevent damage and reduce wind noise ADJUSTABLE HEADBAND added padding for a comfortable fit First up on this list is the Peltor Sport Tactical 100 Electronic Hearing Protector . This headset is one of the industry standards, and for good reason. These earmuffs sit over the ears and operate actively and electronically. That means that they not only reduce gunshot noises, but amplify other sounds such as speech, or the sound of a deer walking through underbrush. These ear protectors have several settings to adjust to the environment you’re shooting in. For example, indoor ranges are usually full of echoes: the Peltor headset can suppress those echoes, making indoor shooting much more enjoyable. These run on standard AAA batteries, and the ear protectors have a two-hour automatic shutoff. Overall, these are a good choice for anyone looking for effective and flexible ear protection. 2. Howard Leight by Honeywell Impact Pro High "Noise Reduction Rating" Sound Amplification "Electronic Shooting Earmuffs" Product Howard Leight by Honeywell Impact Pro High Noise Reduction... "Top Overall Pick" HIGH NOISE REDUCTION RATING (30 NRR): Designed for handgun and... AMPLIFIES AMBIENT NOISE UP TO 4X: Built-in directional... BLOCKS HAZARDOUS NOISE: Actively listens and automatically shuts... COMFORTABLE, SECURE FIT: Rubberized pressure points prevent... INCLUDES: 3.5mm connection cord for MP3 players and scanners;... Our rating Details HIGH NOISE REDUCTION RATING (30 NRR): Designed for handgun and... AMPLIFIES AMBIENT NOISE UP TO 4X: Built-in directional... BLOCKS HAZARDOUS NOISE: Actively listens and automatically shuts... COMFORTABLE, SECURE FIT: Rubberized pressure points prevent... INCLUDES: 3.5mm connection cord for MP3 players and scanners;... Next, we have Howard Leight by Honeywell Impact Pro Sound Amplification Electronic Shooting Earmuffs . These are another electronic option, similar to the Peltor headset. These have a super comfortable headband and active noise canceling technology. There’s also an auto-off feature to save your AAA batteries. This headset stands out in two areas. First, they’ve got a directional microphone to pick up conversations, which is super handy for classes so you’re not taking your ear protection off and risking damage. Second, there is a 3.5mm headphone jack, so you can plug in your phone and listen to music. That’s something I hadn’t really thought about before, but blasting some classic rock while shooting an M16 sounds like a pretty good time to me. These are a great option for the shooting range and are a good overall choice. 3. SureFire EP4 "Sonic Defenders Plus" Filtered Earplugs Product SureFire EP4 Sonic Defenders Plus filtered Earplugs, triple... Top Overall Pick 24dB Noise Reduction Rating (NRR) with filter caps inserted, Hear... Soft, adjustable, triple-flanged stems provide secure seals in... Low-profile design allows you to keep them in place while wearing... Patented EarLock retention rings utilize seven contact points to... Made in USA from hypoallergenic, medical-grade polymer that's... Our rating Details 24dB Noise Reduction Rating (NRR) with filter caps inserted, Hear... Soft, adjustable, triple-flanged stems provide secure seals in... Low-profile design allows you to keep them in place while wearing... Patented EarLock retention rings utilize seven contact points to... Made in USA from hypoallergenic, medical-grade polymer that's... The SureFire EP4 Sonic Defenders Plus Filtered Earplug is a little different. As the name suggests, these are earplugs rather than ear muffs. While muffs generally have better overall hearing protection, there are some distinct advantages to passive earplugs as well. A big plus is their portability. Their size makes it easy to have a pair in every range bag and rifle case, so you’ll never be tempted to leave ear protection behind. There are also no batteries to worry about. The big benefit to these earplugs is their sheer simplicity. If you want to hear with the SureFire earplugs, just remove the center plug – but don’t forget to replace it when you want to go back to shooting. They’re also really low profile, meaning you can wear them under a hat or helmet – great for either hunters or operators. These earplugs are good for hunting use in particular: you can leave the plugs open to hearing, and close them to take the shot. 4. Walker’s "Silencer Digital Earbuds" Product Walker's Silencer Digital Earbuds, Sound Activated... Top Overall Pick Left & right ear buds (pair) with independent volume control... Sound Activated Compression (SAC) Any sounds over 85dB do not get... Include 3 different sizes of foam tips to ensure a tight, secure... Powered by #10 batteries (4 included) 80 hours battery life... Carry case included for convenient storing and transport of your... Our rating Details Left & right ear buds (pair) with independent volume control... "Sound Activated Compression" (SAC) Any sounds over 85dB do not get... Include 3 different sizes of foam tips to ensure a tight, secure... Powered by #10 batteries (4 included) 80 hours battery life... Carry case included for convenient storing and transport of your... Sticking with earplugs for the moment, we have the Walker’s Silencer Digital Earbuds . These earbuds combine the small size of earplugs with some features of the earmuffs. Taking #10 batteries, these earplugs reduce any sounds over 85DB to a hearing-safe 25DB. With any earplug, the fit is vital: any gap means substantial reductions in the benefits of wearing ear protection. Thus, Walker has included three different sizes of foam tips so that you can get the fit you want. The small size is a major plus here: you can keep these in your pocket so you’ll never leave without them. Also, since they’re less bulky than earmuffs, these are a good option for hot environments where having something over your head might get seriously sweaty. These are a great option for someone looking to experiment with a small form and interesting technology. 5. 3M Peltor Soundtrap/Tactical 6-S Electronic Headset Product 3M Peltor Soundtrap/Tactical 6-S Electronic Headset, Black,... Top Overall Pick Active hearing protection NRR 19dB Equipped with stereo microphones and independent volumes controls... Low-profile cup design helps minimize gun stock interference Available in both headband and neckband styles Lightweight Our rating Details Active hearing protection NRR 19dB Equipped with stereo microphones and independent volumes controls... Low-profile cup design helps minimize gun stock interference Available in both headband and neckband styles Lightweight Another offering from Peltor, the 3M Peltor Soundtrap is a different take on the active, over the ear design we’ve seen before. These are electronic headphones that take AAA batteries, an industry standard. Where these differ is in the setup to get them on your ears. The Soundtrap comes in a low profile neckband configuration, which some people may find more comfortable. Additionally, they have somewhat smaller cups than usual. This has the major benefit of fitting better with rifle stocks, allowing you to get a better cheek weld on the stock, improving your overall shooting experience. Peltor is well known for their quality, and these are made in the USA. Where a lot of over-the-ear options are really bulky, these are an attempt to keep things a little bit slimmer and might work better for folks in hot climates that are worried about sweaty headbands. They’re worth a serious look. 6. Smith & Wesson Passive 33 NRR "Hearing Protection Muffs" Product Smith & Wesson Passive 33 NRR Hearing Protection Muffs with... Top Overall Pick Padded headband for comfort NRR 33 noise reduction rating Ultra light weight Our rating Details Padded headband for comfort NRR 33 noise reduction rating Ultra light weight So far we’ve focused mostly on electronic options, and they’re great. But, as anyone who has been hunting or involved any kind of tactical operation will tell you, batteries have a way of dying right when you need them not to. When you need something simple and reliable, go with Smith & Wesson Passive 33 NRR . You will not be winning any operator fashion contests with these: they’re blue, bulky, and totally free of widgets or gadgets. But, if you want your ears to be protected and your head to be comfortable, the thick foam of these earmuffs will get the job done. Simple, useful, and available all the time even if you forgot your bag of batteries in the car. Pop these on and get to shooting. Also, they’re fairly low cost, making them a great option for the budget and safety conscious. 7. G & F 12010 34dB Highest NRR Safety Ear Muffs Product G & F 12010 34dB Highest NRR Safety Ear Muffs - Professional... Top Overall Pick 34db – highest NRR ear defenders for shooting, sports events,... Compact – portable size for efficient storage, the must- have... Adjustable - design adjustment headband of the earmuffs for a... Solid - industrial grade premium quality assured not to break... Our rating Details 34db – highest NRR ear defenders for shooting, sports events,... Compact – portable size for efficient storage, the must- have... Adjustable - design adjustment headband of the earmuffs for a... Solid - industrial grade premium quality assured not to break... Keeping your budget in mind, we have the G & F 12010 . These have the best sound reduction on this list, proving that safety doesn’t have to cost an arm, leg, or, in this case, an ear. For less than the price of a hipster coffee, you can get really good hearing protection and moderately good comfort. These might get a little sweaty over hot-shooting sessions, but they do knock down all noise substantially. While you might want some fancy Peltors for classes, If you’re looking to get ear protection that’s both safe and cheap, this option is for you. Similarly, if you think you might go shooting with friends and family, having a few of these in a range bag is always a good choice. No batteries to worry about, and you won’t be out of a paycheck if one of your friends decides to take them home. 8. Boomstick Low "Profile Noise Cancelling" Hearing Protection Product Boomstick Gun Accessories Low Profile Noise Cancelling Over... Top Overall Pick Provides 22 dB protection Adjustable headband fits virtually all sizes Padded ear cushions off all day comfort Yellow design Sturdy construction for years of continuous use Our rating Details Provides 22 dB protection Adjustable headband fits virtually all sizes Padded ear cushions off all day comfort Yellow design Sturdy construction for years of continuous use Cheaper headsets are often bulky, to say the least. To round off the list, we have a more middle-ground option from Boomstick . These don’t provide the best protection, bringing all noises down only 22DB, but they are both low profile and cheap. They are also pretty comfortable, meaning that you will keep them on during extended shooting sessions. Also, these come in safety yellow, which is handy for keeping track of them or keeping track of the person wearing them, making these a great option for hunters looking to maintain visibility in the woods. There aren’t a ton of frills here, and that is not a bad thing. On a shoestring budget, most of us can afford to have a box full of these. If you have to teach new shooters or are looking to outfit a range, these would be a great choice for you. Additionally, they’re inexpensive enough that if you leave them on your tailgate and drive off, you don’t totally hate yourself. Parting Shots In this list, we’ve looked at a few kinds of ear protection. In terms of ear muffs, we’ve seen active/electronic variations that use microphones and software to diminish the noise of gunfire while amplifying other sounds like a conversation. This type would be best suited to folks taking classes with instructors as well as people shooting for their job. The ability to hear without exposing yourself to damage is a major innovation. That innovation comes with the cost, however, of added complexity and batteries. If it’s simplicity you’re looking for, the passive options that simply deaden all noise might be more your speed. Especially if the cost is a factor, you can get great protection on a limited budget. Similarly, in-ear options are available for people who are conscious of weight and size. These, too, come in both active and passive varieties, so you can find whatever you need. One option that you will want to consider, especially if long term shooting is likely for you, is doubling up. Wearing some simple foam earplugs under the over-the-ear headphones will give you the best possible protection – a great option if you want to keep your hearing for the rest of your life. On that note, we cannot make this point enough: take hearing protection seriously, along with every other aspect of safety . When you’re shooting in particular, ear protection cannot be taken as optional. With that in mind, here’s some advice: buy more than one option for ear protection. At the very least, keep some cheap earplugs in every range bag. If you keep a gun beside your bed, another set should be right next to it, in case you have to use your firearm. Shooting indoors without protection is both damaging and really disorienting when you need to be sharp. Similarly, have some spares for people you might end up shooting with. All in all, you can get good protection for a small budget, so take a look at the options on your list and get one that works for you. This product was presentation was made with AAWP plugin.

Top 7 Firearm Myths & Misconceptions

Top 7 Firearm Myths & Misconceptions

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The firearms world is full of myths, legends, fudd lore, and fairy tales. Some of it is based on half truths, some of it is just made up. This is a small collection of some of crap that you might hear, or might believe yourself, that is purely and totally fake. MFW I read some more fuddy BS I’ve come across some in history books, some in my time as a Marine, and others from the greater gun culture. But today — we’re dispelling them! Firearm Fairy Tales 1. The Shotgun Net of Death I love shotguns, and the shotgun net of death is a firearm fairytale that personally offends me. The reason being is that as a myth its caused a massive counteraction by firearms myth busters. This created a sub myth that the shotgun doesn’t have any spread at close range. Tavor Shotgun shooting! The original myth comes mostly from movies. The idea is that you point a shotgun in the general direction of the bad guy and let loose. Your single round of buckshot will surely destroy whatever is in front of you. No aiming required. Blackpowder driven buckshot throwing a man back 5+ feet… NO! The follow up to the myth that shotguns have no spread has people defending their home with birdshot because, “At close range, it’s basically a slug.” John Woo Wand of Death The truth is, of course, somewhere in the middle. The shotgun doesn’t fire a net of death. Heck, even the old myth of 1 inch per yard is no longer accurate. With modern chokes and different loads, there is no standard way to calculate the spread between different loads. VERY rough guide to chokes. When it comes to shooting, you don’t have to fine-tune your aiming to be effective. With a handgun, you shoot at the heart and lungs to be effective. With a shotgun in a pinch, you can just aim at the torso and still have a very reasonable chance to stop the threat. Shotgun loads like the Federal Flight Control 00 buck sticks together quite closely due to its eight pellet design and excellent shot cup. Kel-Tec KS7 shooting "Federal Flight Control" 00 Buckshot at 15-yards You won’t get that same pattern in Olin Military-grade buckshot, but you still won’t get a net of death. At 10 yards the pattern will be close enough in most guns to stay inside a man-sized torso or even a face shot. It’ll mostly stay in the A zone of an IDPA style target. Shotguns are still awesome weapons, and immensely powerful, and the little spread it has makes it an excellent choice for close quarter’s use. The Benelli M4 , hell ya It’s no net of death, but it’s an effective fight stopper. 2. The Legend of the Undetectable Gun “That punk pulled a Glock 7 on me, you know what that is? It’s a porcelain gun made in Germany. It doesn’t show up on your airport metal detectors and probably costs more than what you make in a month.” With that one quote, Die Hard created a myth about Glock pistols that’s still worth mocking today. The Glock was not made from porcelain but did feature a polymer frame that was somewhat new for the time. However, the slide, spring in the magazine, barrel, and most of the frame parts were metal. Glock Gen 5 , still not made of porcelain. Oh, so is the ammunition. There is no undetectable gun, and as far as I know, there never has been. However, the United States still passed a law prohibiting undetectable firearms. Well, metal-free guns. Good thing we solved that whole “ghost gun” problem back in * checks notes * 1988?! The TSA seems to miss guns all the time, so undetectable is more or less relative. There was a significant uptick in the undetectable guns fairytale when the Liberator premiered as a 3D printable gun. These people ignored the need for metal parts and metal ammunition, but hey what do I know. (left to right) .45 ACP | .429 DE Soft Nose | .429 DE HP | 9mm 3. Revolvers are Inherently More Reliable I’ve had to return or had to have seven guns fixed by the manufacturer. Five of those were revolvers, one was a semi-auto pistol, and the other was a semi-auto rifle. To me, this thoroughly debunked the idea that revolvers are inherently more reliable. A pair of Colt Pythons. (From the collection of Diane Walls). They might look pretty, but they are complex inside! My numerous broken revolvers included free-spinning cylinders, broke cylinder locks, guns that wouldn’t cock into the single-action mode, stuck cylinder releases, and one K frame that would only fire in single action. When revolvers fail, they fail big. Sure they may not jam, but neither does my Glock, CZs, Walthers, or any other quality handgun. Revolvers are more straightforward and easier to fix when it comes to a failure to fire. CZ SP-01, reliable! They aren’t more reliable than quality semi-autos. When a revolver malfunctions, it malfunctions big . In situations where your revolver encounters a hang fire, you can absolutely destroy a revolver. Is timing off? Well great now your gun might be eating small arts of your projectile. Amazing look at how a double-action revolver works (image: C&RSenal ) Fixing a revolver at home is nearly impossible, and unlike an automatic, you can’t simply toss in a replacement part. Most automatics are relatively easy to fix as long as your frame is still intact. Don’t assume all revolvers are bad but don’t buy one because you think they are more reliable. Buy one because you’re a hipster like the rest of us. If you want a gun that is reliable, don’t get a Cobray M11 . If you want to look like a badass, get a Cobray M11 4. The AR 15 Monopod Magazine Myth I first learned this in the Marine Corps during my yearly rifle qualification. Someone asked why they couldn’t rest their rifle on the ground on their magazine. The Primary Marksmanship Instructor informed us that using the magazine as a monopod would cause it to fail. USMC M16A4 with M203 This might have been true decades ago, but magazines have come a very long way since then. Any well-made magazine will no issues being used as a monopod. There is even a base plate that replaces the stock plate with a set of ‘feet’ that turn your magazine into a very effective monopod. Magpul MagPod (image, GunMag Warehouse ) I’ve confirmed this myself, quite a few times. A magazine can be used as a monopod, but it’s not exactly a great monopod. The addition of the Magazine Monopod certainly makes it a much better technique to use. Magpul MagPod - 3 Pack 20 at Gun Mag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 20 at Gun Mag Warehouse Compare prices (3 found) Gun Mag Warehouse (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing You can rest the magazine on the ground or any form of cover, and it will function in your rifle without any kind of issue. I’ve tried it with P-Mags , Lancers , Daniel Defense magazines , and Okay industries aluminum magazines. They all function flawlessly when used as an improvised monopod. Best Magazine Magpul 30 Round PMAG Gen M3 .223/5.56 Magazine 12 at Gun Mag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12 at Gun Mag Warehouse Compare prices (3 found) Gun Mag Warehouse (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 5. The Shockwave from a 50 BMG Can Kill! I remember sitting criss-cross in Boot Camp, listening to my Senior Drill Instructor tell us all sorts of lore. Eventually, somehow we got onto the .50 caliber machine gun known as the M2. My SDI proclaimed that the shockwave from a 50 caliber round could kill someone. What people who have never fired .50 BMG think .50 BMG does when it hits If the bullet just barely missed it could take a man’s arm off! I believed it, well because the Marine Corps is pretty good at making 18-year-olds believe such foolishness. I didn’t know my SDI was a Pog who never deployed much less ever shot a 50 cal at anyone. My Machine gun instructor at the School of Infantry quickly corrected this. Ya’ Boy with an ACOG equipped M249 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, 2009 The myth is utterly ridiculous and how it’s become so mainstream is difficult for me to understand. It leaked out of the military and entered the collective gun consciousness. A video of a deer “dying” from a 50 cal “miss” certainly didn’t help dispel the myth. MFW I watched that stupid video. Of course, this was more likely to be a headshot that entered one eye and left the other. Sure the .50 BMG has a small shockwave, but let’s be real the .50 BMG is big for a bullet but not big compared to nearly anything else in the world. Insert that Dr. Who meme about numbers and relativity. Zach Galifianakis as the next Doctor? Yes? No? Comment below! Jets can create a shockwave powerful enough to break glass, but not powerful enough to rip a person to pieces. To full debunk this firearm’s fairytale we go to Demolition Ranch. Matt put the 50 BMG round against a house of cards, some stacked solo cups and they don’t even fall. This fairy tale is just one of many that have originated from the military. Another that originated from the military is one I like to call: 6. How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Ping Have you ever shot an M1 Garand? If not, you should try it. At least just once. If you haven’t shot one, you are likely familiar with the PING. PING is the noise the gun makes after the last round is fired and the En Bloc clip ejects itself. That ping has to lead many to believe a popular firearm fairytale from WW2 and Korea. The legend has two parts. First, we have the tale of enemy soldiers hearing the ping and knowing that the soldier was now empty. The baddies would then rush the brave American GI and take him out. The second is that GIs learned this and would purposely carry empty En Bloc clips. They could squeeze the clips and then release them to create the ping. Enemy soldiers would then rush into an onslaught of American semi-automatic superiority. Here is the thing. Anyone who’ve ever been in a firefight knows that hearing anything is pretty difficult. Guns are loud, so are grenades, artillery, planes, and everything else that if often on the battlefield. Hearing an individual ping is going to be near impossible. The ping isn’t loud enough to be heard over the gunfire. Also rushing a solider or exposing yourself from cover even if you hear the ping sets you up to get shot in the face. Good luck hearing a single rifle’s PING over the noise of an MG42! Additionally, even if you hear the ping, how would you isolate it to one solider, target that soldier and shoot them before they reload or get behind cover? Plus soldiers don’t fight alone. Just because one guy with an M1 Garand is out of ammo doesn’t mean that all his buddies with their M1s, Tommy guns, 1919s, 1911s, M3, etc. are out of ammo. It’s a fun one, and it even seems possible that it could be true, but it doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. Bloke at the Range made an excellent video on this very subject. 7. Winter is Coming with the M1 Carbine Speaking of M1s, let’s do one of my favorite Firearm’s Fairytales. Not to save the best for last, but I won’t bring one out that combines fudd lore, fantasy, and a military myth. This final Firearms Fairytale revolves around the M1 and M2 carbines, thick winter jackets, and inaccuracy. Modern M1 Carbine from Auto Ordnance The M1 Carbine is one of my favorite firearms. It’s such a fun gun and its chamber in the unique .30 Carbine cartridge. The .30 carbine is a handy little cartridge that’s pretty powerful. It sits between a pistol and rifle round. It proved its worth in WW2 and later Korea. However, in the latter, it became a little less beloved. It had a few issues relating to Cold Weather reliability for sure. However, this wasn’t the only issue related to the .30 Carbine and the cold. Reportedly the M1/M2 Carbine failed to penetrate the thick and likely frozen over jackets worn by the Korean and Chinese soldiers. Group of Soviet solders feeding polar bears from a tank, 1950. (image, RareHistoricalPhotos ) The jacket was a Soviet design and I’d reckon those fellas surely know a thing or two about cold weather and war. At the time when compared to the .30-06 fired from the M1 Garand, the 30 Carbine would appear to be anemic. In reality, the 30 Carbine was a hot little round when used within 200 yards. (L to R) 5.56 NATO, .300 BLK, and .30 Carbine The .30 Carbine is equivalent to a standard .357 magnum fired from a rifle. Really, the .30 Carbine has no problem punching through frozen winter jackets at the .30 Carbines effective range. So… why does this myth exist? Well, it’s likely because soldiers were missing with entire magazines at 100 yards. That’s not a slight at our Korean veterans. As a machine gunner, I lit off way more than 15 or 30 rounds in a firefight and hit nothing. Take it from a machine gunner, this isn’t how to use full auto. People miss, they miss a lot in war. Especially when someone else is shooting at you while you’re shooting at them. The Brothers Colt and Their Firearms Fairytales Firearms Fairytales, myths, and lore are quite present. These are the ones I’ve heard most often. But there are dozens, even hundreds more. Some of them are strange and blatantly wrong, some are closer to the truth than you might think. With that in mind, what firearm fairy tales have you heard? Let us know below! If you want some study material so might guard against firearm fairy tales, take a look at our Beginner’s Guide to Guns !

Manticore Scorpion Mags Shot Show

Manticore Scorpion Mags  Shot Show

I’m a Scorpion nut. I’ve owned both the rifle and pistol variants of the weapon and absolutely love it as my primary pistol caliber carbine. One of the weak points was the magazines. The polymer feed lips broke quite often in some of the earlier sets of magazines. This problem has long been fixed with CZ’s magazines but metal feed lips will always outclass polymer. (At least for now.)  Manticore is going to be releasing their Scorpion mags and they will be outfitted with lovely metal feed lips. Steel feed lips Scorpion Mags Like traditional CZ Scorpion mags, they are translucent and mostly made from polymer. Unlike CZ’s Scorpion mags they have metal feed lips and fit 32 rounds instead of 30. This gives you an extra double tap when you need it most Manticore arms is pretty well known for making good gear and I’ve never heard anything wrong about Sven and his company. The Old Scorpion magazine I’m a major fan of Lancer magazines and these seem like the CZ variant of Lancer magazines. I really can’t wait for these to hit the market. These are made for Manticore, but will be hitting Prepper Gun shop and sold through them. They will be clear and smoke as well. They’ll be available by the end of first quarter 2017.

Aimpoint vs. Eotech Comparison — Which Is Better? (ANSWERED) Photo by Timothy T. / CC BY Red dot optics are a booming business. Since the War on Terror has started, we’ve seen simple red dot optics shrink in size but dominate in market potential. “Red dot scope” is a term that describes a wide variety of different optics and is somewhat generic. These optics have a variety of styles and include reflex sights, tube red dots, and holographic red dots. These optics are relatively simple and designed to be used at close range. Their method of use is simple: put the dot on the target and pull the trigger. Red dot optics make engagements faster and easier than lining up traditional iron sights and are much easier when engaging moving targets. The two big names in red dot design are Aimpoint and EOTech, and folks often wonder which would come out on top in a war of Aimpoint vs. Eotech . Aimpoint’s optic tend to be the more traditional red dot and a tube design that resembles most scopes. The EOTech is known as a holographic red dot. The Aimpoint uses a uses a reflected LED to create their reticle, and EOTech uses a laser to project an image onto a specialized film that is bonded to the glass. The Aimpoint and EOTech have both been adopted by the United States Military, the Aimpoint serving most famously with the U.S. Army and the EOTech being a favorite of Marine Special Forces. What they Have in Common You can put these two optics against each other without at first acknowledging what they have in common. First off, both optics are 1x magnification, a necessary feature for a red dot optic. Next, most models are compatible with night vision optics and magnifiers and are adjustable for different brightness levels. Both optics are parallax free, which means the reticle remains in position regardless of where you move your head. Both optics can be used on rifles, shotguns, carbines, and even sub machine guns. The smaller options both companies offer (IE Aimpoint Micro H-1 and EOTech XPS2 and 3) can be fitted and used on large handguns. Of course, both optics excel at close range combat. EOTECH XPS2 Holographic Weapon Sight Price: $528.99 Price as of 08/14/2020 06:34 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Aimpoint 200018 Micro, H-1 2 MOA W/Standard Mount Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 11:42 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Battery Life – WINNER: Aimpoint Regardless of the Aimpoint optic used, the Aimpoint brand always destroys EOTech in battery life. Let’s take the Aimpoint Comp M4s and the EOTech 512 for example as they are both the full sized red dot optics and completely comparable. The Comp M4S uses a single AA battery and lasts for a stunning 80,000 hours. That’s 8 years, folks! The EOTech 512 uses two AA batteries and lasts 1,000 continuous hours with lithium batteries. Now, 1,000 hours are impressive sure, but compared to 80,000, it’s nothing. The reason being is that the simple reflected LED makes literally a simple red dot as your reticle. The EoTech’s use of a more complicated reticle and the laser drains batteries a lot faster. But again, 1,000 hours means 41 days, which is still impressive. When it comes to battery life, the battle of Eotech vs. Aimpoint has an obvious winner: AIMPOINT Aimpoint CompM4S - Battle Proven, Chaos Approved! Watch this video on YouTube

Bushnell AK Optic Review Dropping Rounds and targets

The AK series of rifles are the second most popular series of rifles in the United States. Even with that being said dedicated AK optics are hard to come by. The AK is meant to be used at ranges of 300 yards, so the optics market has never been large. The Bushnell AK Optic is one of the most modern and affordable option for scoping any rifle in 7.62×39. For example, I tested and utilized this scope on my SIG 556R, a 7.62 x 39mm SIG 556. The R standing for Russian of course. The Bushnell AK optic isn’t just for AKs, ARs, the M+M M10, and the PTR 32 are all 7.62 x 39mm rifles that can benefit from this scope. Bushnell was more than happy to provide me with a production model for review over the last few weeks. The Rundown of the Bushnell AK optic During my Bushnell AK optic review, I was impressed more than once. I’m not a rich man and the best optic I’ve ever used was a Trijicon ACOG. I’m not the type of guy who can afford a Schmidt and Bender, or Nightforce optics. What I can afford is the Bushnell AK optic. That’s what drew me to it. With an MSRP of 250 bucks, I only expected a working optic, not much more. I was wrong. This is a 1-4 x 24 power optic with a 30mm tube. I mounted it with low pro Vortex rings. The rings are a bit low, but I already had them on hand. I did have to remove my rear iron sight. Anyway, the optic features an illuminated reticle with four drop points. It’s a BDC reticle that allows you to reach out to 400 yards. The adjustment turrets are fingertip adjustable and can be reset to zero for making easy calls for wind and distance in the field, and then put the weapon back to its normal zero. Turrets and Battery Cap Through the Bushnell AK Scope The Bushnell AK optic is surprisingly clear and easy to use. The smaller 24mm objective lens matches the 4x power magnification and keeps it comfortable when it’s bright outside. Zeroing the optic is very easy to do. Since it’s a second focal plane optic I set the magnification to 4x and zeroed it at 50 yards. It took twelve rounds to zero, firing in three-round strings. The reticle is easy to see during the day without illumination. There are 11 illumination settings, and an extra battery is stored in the turret caps. Everything is intuitive and self-explanatory. Through the Looking Glass Close Range A 1-4 optic can be used as what is basically a red dot. It’s simple to do. Open both eyes, set the magnification to 1x and turn the illumination on. With both eyes open it gives the appearance of a red dot optic. and makes close range encounters pretty easy to deal with. The biggest issue is the illumination is kind of weak. Regardless of the ambient light I always had to use it at 11 to effectively see the reticle. Even so utilizing the Bindon aiming concept makes hitting close range target simple, it’s mostly instinct at contact distances. Out to 25 yards, it’s still simple to place effective shots on a target. Effective shots being chest and head shots. Long Range Long Range with an AK is subjective. I say 400 yards is long range. The BDC was accurate out to three hundred yards and this is the furthest I could test it. I found I need to hold just a hair high, with the bottom of the third chevron on top of the target. In the prone position, it was almost boring hitting the target at the 300-yard line. My SIG 556R is a little more accurate than the average AK, but it’s still limited by the round itself. Especially because I wasn’t spending real money on AK ammo. I used the classic Wolf Steel cased 123-grain ammunition. At 4 power I could easily see the target at 300 yards and engage it pretty effectively. What sucked was that 30 round AK mag in the prone position, but I made it work Medium Range The AK and the 7.62×39 excels in that 100 to 200-yard range and this optic is the same. Transitioning between these ranges with the Bushnell Ak Optic was simple. Transitioning magnification ranges between these ranges is simple due to the textured magnification ring. The ring itself is marked for a wide variety of different ranges. Close range is really where the AK, the 7.82 x 39, and the Bushnell AK optic rules. During my Bushnell Ak optic review I had the most fun transitioning to the standing-prone, and kneeling at 100 to 200 yards. Purpose If you want to hunt, or plink with your AK style rifle this scope is absilutely perfect for you. The same goes for rocking action shooting sports. If you wanna break away from the AR 15 fan club this is the scope to do it. Although, for action sports, I would prefer to see a throw lever and maybe brighter magnification. I like to hunt hogs with the 7.62 x 39 and the addition of this scope over crappy AK sights is a blessing. AK iron sights suck in 99% of cases, so a good optic can make a big difference. Wit my 556R I noticed an impressive difference, and for the cost, the Bushnell AK optic, 1 to 4 power, is an excellent optic. It’s affordable and is a good choice for America’s second most popular rifle. The Bushnell AK optic is a good scope for the AK wielder, like our own Rick D. Like the A 47 its cheap, affordable, and easy to use. Unlike the AK it wasn’t designed in 1947. Want one for your rifle, check out one here.

Summary

We have all had to learn how to shoot a pistol at one time or another whether it was through a civilian shooting class, the military, or some other setting. The one thing I am sure that we all learned about was the basic “pistol fundamentals” of marksmanship. The fundamentals are supposed to be a list of key factors that you must pay special attention to if you wish to make an accurate shot.